Worldbuilding JMD Reid Style!!

Worldbuilding.

It’s everywhere.

It’s one of the most important parts of a story regardless of your genre, but when you get into Fantasy and SciFi, it is essential to get write.

Done well, worldbuilding is not noticeable. Botch it, and it leaves your audience asking questions to understand it.

I remember this clearly when I watched the movie Battle Royale. It’s a Japanese movie about a class of high school students, twenty boys and twenty girls, that are abducted  by the government, taken to a remote island, outfitted with explosive collars, and told they have to kill each other.

Yes, it’s very similar to the Hunger Games, but let’s not worry about that.

This appears to be modern Japan, not some post-apocalypse hellscape. So why were they abducted? There’s not a good reason given in the movie. We’re told that every year, one class of their year in the country are chosen by lottery to fight to the death. That winners get set up for life.

But why do they do this? What possible reason could a society have to do this to their children?

Worse, their old teacher is the person administering their Battle Royale. He’s clearly here to get some sort of revenge on this delinquent class.

So while what follows is rather good as the students form factions, some wanting to survive, others wanting to escape, and others falling into their dark sociopathy and finally able to act without restraint. As good as it was, the movie failed is worldbuilding and I could not enjoy it.

Later, I had the chance to read the book, a

 

nd there were my answers. One, their teacher isn’t the administrator. It’s just a military officer. Second, this isn’t modern Japan. This is a Japan that hadn’t lost World War 2 and is still fascist, military dictatorship. The Battle Royales were set up to study how people act in combat and stress, and now decades later, there’s not a bureaucrat  that’s willing to put their neck on the line and stop it.

The book did its world building that the movie failed to do.

So this is important when you are making fiction. And when you have to make up a whole world that isn’t ours, how do you go about it?

After you come

 

up with your story, what you want to tell, make a list of what you need for the world. What geographic features do you want? What is the scope of your world? What sort of nations do you want?

What type of story are you telling? Something small and personal? Something that will shake up the entire world? A story about a journey? About armies? About commerce?

When I was worldbuilding the Storm Below, I wanted to make a world of floating islands. I wanted some to be big but most to be small. I wanted to make it look sort of like Indonesia.

When I was making the world for the Cycle of Illumination, I wanted a world that was big as our world. One where there were multiple continents. I wanted a world that could be host to so many stories. So I wanted many countries, ethnicities, and cultures. I wanted parts of this world not to know about the other parts. I had no geographic features I wanted. Just the size. I would use what I made on my map to let that determine how the world flowed.

For Shadow of the Dragon, I wanted a world that would have many fantastical places for my characters to visit. I wanted there to be evidence of a past magical conflict that scarred the world. In the center, I wanted a lost land hidden by a storm with the other continents and lands around it.

As you might have noticed, it’s drawing the map that I see as the foundation of Fantasy worldbuilding.

If you’re not having a story set in a small location, you should make a map. Sketch it by hand or use a program to draw it. Whatever works best for you. It can be rough. It’s for your reference to make the world coherent. To keep it clear where things lie to each other. Even better, you can find inspiration as you draw it.

When I am making my maps, I focus on getting the aspects I need. I make sure it works in a coherent fashion. Mountains and rivers and forests and deserts in spots that make sense, unless there’s some supernatural reason for it.

As I get my important stuff down, I have more space to fill in. I’ll put interesting features. I might even sketch an evocative name, not sure what it means, but feeling potential that sparks my imagination and that of my readers.

Odds are, your characters are not visiting every bit of the map, but that’s okay. Because you are making the foundation of your world. If you share your map with readers, they can stare at it and wonder what is there, or what is that.

From the map, we can paint our world.

Add our countries.

Features.

Places.

From here, you can work out the details your story needs, but we’ll talk about where to focus your efforts in building your world and where needs just a quick coat of paint.

In the JMD Reid method of fantasy worldbuilding, the map is the foundation. So make it a good one and you’ll have that world that won’t make your reader question things. They won’t be distracted. You’ll have created verisimilitude, an important step in your fiction.

  • Sill no progress on Sands of Loss (and I’m really digging this title) but I will get back to editing Fractured Soul and get it ready for my editor this weekend!
  • I found this article today. Writers you should check it out!
  • Wow, look at this bad mamajama! Let’s caption!

It’s Taxes Tuesday! Yay…

Hello all! How is your Tuesday going!

My accounts are done with my taxes and now want money! And so does the government. Sigh…

Not getting much writing done on Sands of Loss. Have some ghostwriting work and it’s the start of the month, so I have to go over my payments and stuff. Got to make sure I set aside money for taxes.

Being self-employed has some interesting hurdles, including the fun of paying quarterly taxes!

I am 2/3 through my final draft of Fractured Soul (Assassin’s of Illumination Book 3)! I will have it done by the end of the week!

What are you up to?

  • It’s Authors in Focus Podcast Episode 80! Today, I chatted with Samantha Evans! Give it a listen here!
  • Found this on Twitter today! That it’s funny!

Monday Update and $5 Amazon Gift Card Giveaway!

Monday has come again… Sigh!
 
But that’s fine. It’s a new month. March. Winter’s end is in sight. The sun is up so much earlier!
 
Always busy on the first of the month. Haven’t had a chance to write on Sands of Loss, but hoping to get to it next. I have an interview to record with Tom Lloyd. It’ll be fun.
 
Congrats to Emily Wiebe! She won last weeks $5 Amazon Gift Card.
 
Michael Evan is getting ARCs ready for Max and the Captain today, so stand by!
 
If you want an ARC of Mask of Guilt coming out on May 12, let me know.
 
What are you getting up to today?
  • Want to win this week’s $5 Amazon Gift Card, comment blow on what your favorite Fantasy Couple is! Mine is Liam and Karan from The View from the Glass Quarter by Ian Irvine!
  • Let’s caption! Who is this big boy? A corrupted knight? A demon marauder? Best Halloween costume?

~~Arc Readers Wanted~~

Mask of Guilt (Mask of Illumination Book 1) is being released on May 12th.

I am looking for ARC readers so we can hit the ground running with reviews! If you want a copy and can have an honest review ready by May 12th, please comment below!

You are going to love this book!

We all wear masks…

…to hide from our guilt.

Lady Foonauri is on the far side of the world. Her life of indolence and chasing wealth has left the young noblewoman empty inside. She wears a mask of happiness while she weeps inside for the two men she loved.

And destroyed.

One man, however, sees her more than a beautiful ornament. He sees a woman who can change the world. Onyx offers Foonauri a new mask to wear and the chance to do something meaningful with her life. To be a thief and steal a dangerous artifact before it falls into dark hands.

Is this Foonauri’s chance to take off her mask of guilt and find purpose in her life? Will being a thief who takes her destiny in her own hands bring her peace?

Or is she entering a world that will swallow her whole?

You’ll be captivated by this exciting fantasy story because of the passion and drive of its characters will keep you reading!

Happy Friday!

Friday is upon us!
WOOT! WOOT!
Writing felt off today. It might have to be that I’m cutting back on how much food I’m eating. I need to lose weight and, frankly, that means eating less. So my body is not happy.
So hungry…
But I’ve done this once. If I can just get over the hump and adapt, it’ll work! So fingers crossed!
At 9 PM in the Fantasy/Sci FI Focus Blog I’ll be doing a live read from my novella Time’s Prison! I hope you’ll check it out!
How’s your day going!
  • Check out my interview from Adam Gaffen!
  • Who’s this bad mother fer? Let’s caption!

It’s Thursday! Captain and the Max is Finished!

Hello! It’s Thursday!

Great day today.

I finished off Max and the Captain, so Michael is going to get that edited up. Stay tuned for ARC copies and it’ll also be an Audiobook!

Going to get more writing on Sands of Loss today. I’m so excited for this book. Got a new character in the group, leading to some great stuff!

What are you up to today?

  • Author in Focus Podcast: Episode # is out of my podcast. Today I chatted with ! You have to check it out!
  • Great Music: The 8 Bit Band is something I’ve been grooving to. They do big band covers of video game music! Check it out!
  • Today’s quote: “The writer must wade into life as into the sea, but only up to the navel.” –Gustave Flaubert
  • Look at this pic! Evocative, isn’t it! Let’s caption!

It’s Humpday!

Good day! Happy Wednesday!

We made it to the middle of the week!

I’m almost done writing the ending of Max and the Captain! Will get that done tomorrow! I wrote some real surreal stuff (and, boy, is real surreal not terrible writing)?

How is your day going? Great? Awesome? Blegh?

The other week, I was reading a Japanese Light Novel called Mapping: The Trash-Tier Skill That Got Me Into a Top-Tier Party! That is a mouthful of a name,  I know. It’s a weird trend in Japanese fiction. Anyways, most light novels are fluff. Power fantasy, strange ideas, comedies. If you watched Anime, a lot of them are based off light novels.

Anyways, this one wasn’t fluff. On the surface, sure. It has many of the hallmarks of those. The comedy. The fan service. But it also has a really great message.

In this world, people are born with 3 skill slots. This is what is called gamelit. The world works like it’s a video game though to the people in it, this is just how the world works. Everyone gets this skill slots and around 16. Some skills are rare than others and some take up more than 1 slot. They can make you an amazing swordsmen, an awesome mage, or the best carpenter around. They determine what you’ll be good at. Where you should focus your abilities.

But some are not seen as useful.

Our main character gets Mapping. It’s an Ultra-rare ability that takes up all three of his slots. All it does is let him have a map in his head in a 1 kilometer ring. He remembers the maps of every place he’s been. It’s not even the only skill like this. There are two others that are similar, one is even more useful, and they don’t take up all three skill slots.

Our main character dream of going on an adventure with the his childhood friend are dashed. How can he keep up with her when she got three god-tier abilities that have made her into the one of the best adventurers around.

He believes he has been dealt a flaw. That it’s worthless. And that is his mindsight. Six months later, his best friend can’t handle his negativity, his unwillingness to try. She tried to make it work, but he didn’t.

He fulfilled his own prophecy.

He falls into depression. Drink. He’s worthless. So he acts it. Then one day, a member of one of the best adventuring parties in the world shows up and says they need him.

That he has seen his ability the wrong way. His Mapping skill is what they need to conquer a dungeon. A feat no other group has managed.

With a change of his mindset, our main character takes what he saw as a negative into a positive. He changed how he viewed it. No longer a victim of circumstance, he is making his own fate. It transforms him. He won’t be a powerful fighter, a grand mage, or an inspiring priest, but that doesn’t mean he has no value.

It’s a beautiful idea, isn’t it? We make our own luck. Our own fate. We fulfill our own prophecies. Believe you’ll fail. You will.

  • Quote of the day: “If the writer were more like a reader, he’d be a reader, not a writer. It’s as uncomplicated as that.” –Julian Barnes
  • Here’s a great article on building an audience as a writer!
  • Never too late to enter in the weekly $5 Amazon Gift Card! Click here to enter! No purchase necessary!
  • Let’s caption an awesome pic!

Tuesday Round Up! Podcasts and More!

Good Tuesday to you all!

I’ve started writing the second half of Max and the Captain, the series of books I’m cowriting with Michael Evan! It’s been an interesting experience.

I’m chipping away at Sands of Loss (Shadow of the Dragons Book 4). I’m into Chapter 3. Getting about 3000 words a day. It’s going to be amazing!

What awesome things are you up to?

  • Episode 78 of my Authors in Focus Podcast is out! Check out my conversation with Holly Bargo! You have to give this a listen!
  • I’m nearly done with the next chapter of The Judging Eye Reread. Everyone is running in terror from the Wight-in-the-Mountain!
  • Want to win a $5 Amazon Gift Card, click here!
  • Let’s play a fun game! What is your fantasy villain title! I’m The Red Prince of the Seas!

The Soldier’s Wife 5: Why Soldiers Fight

The Soldier’s Wife 5: Why Soldiers Fight

 

The Thirty-Ninth Day of Spring, the Three Thousand and Fiftieth Year of the Kingdom

The alarm thundered.

Why can’t you let me mourn? the exhausted Lamahavi thought. Her eyelids felt like lead weights, her swollen ankles throbbed, she had to pass water once more, and the light-cursed demons attacked the Bulwark.

Again!

Frantic drums pounded through the Ring City, summoning defenders to drive back the enemy into the Diamond Ward and keep them from flooding into the city. More good men like Lamahavi’s husband would die today.

A single year was all she’d had with him. It was nothing at all. A fleeting moment in a life. Her dreams of growing old with Yelaikav snuffed away by the resinsword of one of the ant-like demons who sought to drown this world in darkness.

She stared down at her husband’s corpse as she prepared his body for the funerary boat. It would float him down the Fraught Curve, the river that flowed past the Ring City and out of the Forbidden Arc. At its terminus, where the waters would pour into the sea, lay the City of the Embalmed Dead. The hallowed resting site for the Songblade Knights and their families, especially those men who had died in the defense of not just the Forbidden Kingdom, but the entire world at large. All those ignorant nations who did not know how Lamahavi’s people—Lamahavi herself—suffered to keep them safe.

Yelaikav looked like he was sleeping, his cheeks pale and smooth. His features relaxed, eyes closed. His hands were folded across his chest, gripping the carved-bone hilt of his Songblade, the hallowed weapon he’d wielded. It was her right to keep it in trust for their child, if she carried a son in her belly, or to let it be buried with Yelaikav in the mausoleum city.

One day, she would be granted a place at his side, to lie interred and preserved against the decay of the world.

The alarms thundered. Boomed. The drums pounded with a frantic energy, and she did not care. Nothing mattered. The world had become ash, smothered beneath bitterness. The light of her life, the bright, shining diamond that had made living in the Ring City bearable, had been stolen from her.

He would never compose terrible poetry to make her smile. Tell silly jokes to make her laugh. Share kisses to make her sigh. He would never get to see his child in this life. She trembled as the injustice overwhelmed her.

Why?” she cried out to Layiv, the Diamond Lady. The goddess who’d erected the Diamond Ward and charged her ancestors to defend the world. “Why him? Why my husband? Did you need him in your White Choir? Why couldn’t you let him stay with me? Even another year. You could have at least let him hold our child! Answer me!”

BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

Shut up!” she spat at the drums, her bloodshot eyes wild. A bestial madness twisted her young face. “You’re why he’s dead! You killed him! That booming. You summoned him to his death!”

BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

She screeched, irrationality spilling through her. A tangle of brown hair fell in thick strands to her shoulders. A matted mess. She scratched at her face, raking red lines down her smooth cheeks as the drums kept pounding. They thundered from every direction.

BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!

QUIET!”

But they wouldn’t stop. They kept resounding. She leaned over her husband, her wrinkled kimono shifting over her round belly. She was close to delivery. Weeks or even days away. She pressed her face into his chest as she sobbed. Her grief poured out of her. She clutched his orange kimono, fingers scratching at the silk.

Come back to me!” she begged. “Please, please, come back to me. I need you.”

A shadow fell on her.

Yel?” she asked, this moment of irrationality seizing her that her husband had descended from the White Choir to be with her once more. That the Diamond Lady had relented and freed him from his service in the next life to be with her.

It wasn’t Yelaikav.

It wasn’t even human.

She stared in stupefied shock at the demon approaching her, the setting sun stretching its long shadow to fall around her kneeling form. Its umbral twin hugged her body in impending night. The first time she’d seen one of the hulking things, the inhuman visage had sent gibbering terror through her. Numbed by grief and exhaustion, she now merely stared bleary-eyed at the monster, not registering the danger that approached her.

It stood on two legs, slender and covered in a black, waxy carapace, knees creaking with each step. The legs descended from its armored thorax. Thrusting behind it was its swollen abdomen, a few spindly hairs bristling on the soft flesh. Two pairs of arms thrust from its thorax, each one like the legs, armored in its chitin. It held a greatsword in its four hands, a beastly weapon made of black resin hardened to the toughness of diamond. Its triangular head fixed on her. Eyes like black onyx, covered with many facets, gleamed. Antennae spamed and its sharp, crushing mandibles spasmed. A scent like vomit, the bite of sour bile, filled her nose.

It came to kill her.

She didn’t care about that. Nothing mattered to her. Everything had been taken from her. She stared listlessly at its advance, the boom of the drums fading. In a small corner of Lamahavi’s mind, it registered that the breach must be titanic for a demon to get so far from the Bulwark. For every drum in the city to be pounding.

I’ll see you soon, my love, drifted through the haze of her thoughts like a piece of flotsam bobbing across a fog-choked lake. It hardly did more than eddy through her exhaustion.

The demons held no mercy. They came from another world. A universe of darkness they sought to escape. They would transform this world and cover it with their foul hives. Slaughter every human and replace them with their squirming larvae.

Lamahavi knew it was her duty to fight, but . . .

Duty had made her into a widow.

Honor had left her broken.

The demon stopped on the other side of her husband’s corpse. It raised that huge blade to cut her in half. Ruddy light played on the smooth, black surface. The edge glinted in the setting sunlight. She sat transfixed by her impending death.

Her child kicked her in the ribs.

Hard.

Pain burst from the impact. It slammed into that fog smothering her thoughts. A reminder that one part of her husband had survived. The blade slashed down at her. Lamahavi acted. She snatched the Songblade’s handle and threw herself back in one motion.

She landed on her back, her pregnant stomach making the movement awkward. The blade struck the stone where she’d knelt moments before. A crystalline crack echoed through the air. The demon chittered as it raised its sword and advanced on her. She struggled to stand. She pushed up with her elbows. She would never dodge the blow before it struck her.

The sword slashed down at her again, hacking towards her belly.

She smacked the handle of the Songblade into her thigh. A gesture her husband had done a hundred times. The tuning fork hidden in the hollow cylinder hummed to life. The sound activated the diamond embedded at the other end.

The blade sang.

A sword of light appeared. A glowing brilliance of white, the manifestation of the Tone of Diamond. She thrust it up before her to ward off the attack. The resin blade slammed into the radiance. The blade sang louder as it repulsed the attack. She didn’t even feel the strength of the demon, the titanic power it held.

It was nothing before the power of the Tones of Harmony.

She shuddered as it drew back its blade. She had a chance. She had never fought with a Songblade, but desperation animated her body. She had to protect her baby. With great effort, she sat up and got her sandal-clad feet beneath her. She heaved upright with a groan, thigh and calf muscles protesting after hours of kneeling. Knee joints popped. Her lower back throbbed.

She fell into a fighting stance but swayed, unsteady. Her pregnancy made her more top-heavy and threw off her balance. She leaned back to compensate, but it changed how she stood, affecting her footwork.

The sword slashed at her.

She raised the blade before it. It weighed hardly anything. Only the handle, made from the hollow wing bone of an Imperial Condor, had any substance. The sword sang as it caught the enemy blade. The demon’s mandibles snapped together. Its antennae twitched.

It swung at her with fast strokes. The huge sword moved like a black blur before her. Lamahavi gasped. Her sandaled feet scraped across the flagstones. Its clawed feet clicked with its steps as it drove her back.

The blade flashed before her as she parried, struggling to hold back the demonic attack. Her left hand cradled her belly. Her child kicked with ferocity and squirmed inside of her. A powerful cramp blazed through her nethers.

Liquid spilled down her thighs and splashed at her feet.

No,” she groaned. The pain twisted through her stomach.

The demon didn’t care that she had entered labor. It only wanted to cut off her head. To kill her child fighting to enter this world. She screamed against the contraction squeezing about her womb and blocked the next attack.

She had to find an opening. She had to dispatch the demon. She wobbled, battling against collapse. Sweat spilled down her face, soaking her thin eyebrows. A drop ran into her left eye. She blinked against the stinging salt.

The demon swept in.

She didn’t know the forms to attack. She only knew how to fight with a spear. All she could do was hastily throw it before her and deflect or parry the powerful blows. If she didn’t attack and kill it, the pain of labor would soon overwhelm her.

No!” she screamed her defiance at the demon. “You won’t take all of him away from me!”

Lamahavi had to treat her sword like a spear. She felt more comfortable with the weapon. She aimed the point at the thing’s carapace. Would this work?

Its sword swept in hard. She jerked her arm to the left, moving the lower half of the blade while keeping the point aimed at the demon’s thorax. She struck the weapon to the side, deflecting the resinsword past her shoulder. Her pregnant belly heaving before her, she lunged a riposte thrust at the enemy’s chest like she held a spear.

Her legs snapped forward. She screamed through the agony contracting through her womb. Her child kicked. She stepped on sandals and socks soaked in her amniotic fluid. A sweet smell permeated the air, clashing with the bile stench of the demon. She rammed the point of the shining blade at its chest.

The glowing tip struck.

The demon’s carapace melted beneath the purity of the weapon’s song. The radiance sizzled against the chitin and burned through its armor. She buried the sword into its chest. Mandibles snapped at her as the thing died, a final attack to steal her life.

She sliced up with the sword on instinct. The radiant blade cut through the demon’s shell with disturbing ease. No resistance at all. In a heartbeat, it flashed up through its thorax and split the demon’s head in half. It fell half-apart before her as its momentum crashed it into her. A mandible stabbed into her shoulder.

She staggered back and twisted her body, bending half over to protect her belly from the collapsing demon’s impact. The mandible ripped from her shoulder. Blood spurted. She staggered, her contractions twisting through her guts.

The Songblade fell from her hand. It hit the ground with a jarring impact, silencing the tuning fork. The humming died along with the radiant blade. She didn’t care. She screamed out again. The pain was coming so fast now. She fell to her knees. Blood oozed from the wound in her left shoulder. That arm barely wanted to work as she fumbled to open her kimono.

Help!” she screamed, the drums thundering in the distance.

It was all happening so fast. She thrust open her kimono and howled as her shoulder blazed with agony. Her screams resounded through the jetty. She unfolded it on the ground and then sank onto it, her thighs spread apart. She wore only her shorter under kimono. She had no one to help her, and her child came.

She pushed at the contractions. She screeched, the cry tearing at her throat, as the pain ripped through her nethers. Time lost all meaning to her as the drums echoed in the distance. Her cries mixed with the sounds of battle resounding through the city. Men died in all directions.

But she could feel her child coming. Sliding out. She had to keep pushing. Instinct controlled Lamahavi. She had midwifed twice since arriving at the Ringed City. She knew she had to push with the contractions. Her entire face contorted as she kept bearing down. Her cheeks blazed scarlet as she screamed again.

The head crowned. She kept pushing. Lamahavi whimpered, hoping her child would be fine with no one to grab the little baby. She squeezed her eyes shut as, finally, her baby was born. She panted, sucking in deep breaths.

No crying.

No, no, no!” she wailed. She lifted the child into her arms, covered in afterbirth and smeared in blood, skin turning blue. Such a tiny thing. A boy, eyes closed, mouth covered. She hooked her finger, cleared his mouth, then brought the child to her shoulder.

She patted his bottom. The child squirmed. Then the cries rose from his lungs. A healthy wail. Color spread across his body. Tears spilled from her eyes as she cradled her little baby boy. So tiny and fragile, his fists squeezed tight as he cried.

Mahaikan,” she whispered, the name her husband had chosen on his deathbed. “Mahaikan, look at you.” Despite the pain and exhaustion, she smiled broadly. She looked up at the heavens. “Yelaikav, we have a son!”

They found her hours later, lying in a stupor with her baby crying at her breast. She lay between her husband’s body and the demon she’d killed with a Songblade. Blood soaked her shoulder. Medics were called while whispers echoed around her.

Lamahavi understood her husband more now than she ever had. Why he’d fought. Even why he’d even died. What she held in her arms was the most important thing in the world. Mahaikan was more than hers and Yelaikav’s son; he was the future. Theirs. Their race’s. The world’s. Every baby held the promise of greatness. A promise that it was all worth the price she’d paid in blood and tears.

Soldiers understood that. The good ones, at least. The ones who were not conscripted but who made the choice to stand day after day at the edge of order and stare into the abyss. To hold back the madness for one more year, one more month.

One more hour.

She had held it back today long enough to bring about a miracle.

The soldier’s wife vowed to stay in the Ringed City. To raise her son and teach him what his father had died for. She would help those she could. Her husband was dead, but there were other good men who stood against the darkness.

The light could only shine bright so long as hope remained. Anyone could take up its light and slay the night. Even a pregnant woman smothered by grief and exhaustion, wracked by pain and agony, could take it up.

Lamahavi would keep her husband’s blade in trust for their son. Every day, she would think of Yelaikav. She knew he sang to her from the White Choir above. She had the strength to stand day after day and protect the future until the time came for her to float down the Fraught Curve and lie beside her husband until the world ended.

As she held her son to her breast, she knew so long as hope blazed bright, the end would never come.

The END

Author of The Storm Below Series